Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we cannot get any better speakers for today's events. as washington is focused on the fiscal cliff and other issues are around the budget and long- term fiscal discipline, one may wonder why we're having an event on education. we are doing it because these issues are inextricably linked. insurers the united states is maintaining its edge in the global economy. america is role is central to that competitiveness. that has not just happened by happenstance. it has been the work led by the private sector but decisions that have been critical to that success. we look at the questions around the united states fiscal discipline. we wanted to make sure that we have some discussion about the assessment we made in the role of issues that are not always at the forefront. the vital role america's universities have played. the fact that our institutions of higher learning are the best in the world and people from around the world want to come to the united states to be our next generation of on japan new hours because of our system of higher education. the staff that we have our worldwide brand
cliff negotiations. and live as 7:00 a.m., your calls and comments on "washington journal." >> i think reuters institute is something that is important within the culture. we are a culture of words, voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we are not completely tied to print on the page in the sense of writing. i think there is no other art forms so readily accessible, other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. it is something -- there is something in literature that catches the human spirit. >> joined book tv, american history tv, and c-span's local content vehicle as we look at the literary life of new york's capital city, albany. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span 3. >> house speaker john boehner told reporters the white house has wasted another week in negotiations of the fiscal cliff. this is about five minutes. >> good morning. this is not a progress report. there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. 8 day
- called fiscal cliff and the budget cuts that take place in january. after that, we will examine the po
. >> that was one of the things i found interesting is washington is so obsessed right now with the fiscal cliff, myself included, and what is happening with the budget showdown, the polling seem to indicate that for most americans of said the beltway, job creation and the state of the economy remains their main concern. what were you going to say? what's i think they go hand in hand. from a business perspective, large corporations are sitting on lots of cash. they are uncertain of what the future will bring. that is the economic future, but the future of tax policy and the rest of that. that is keeping the economy back. if we can reach a deal where we are not coming to blows every six months or one year on what tax policy will look like for another six months, that will give us confidence and will create jobs people want. i am not sure if there is a bifurcation between what washington is focused on and what people want. i think this is about jobs and economic growth. >> i did find one thing surprising. behind retirement programs, social security and medicare, seems to be job creation, deficit r
a discussion on the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations and the impact on unemployment insurance. from "washington journal" this is 40 minutes. host: we continue our look at unemployment insurance and its role in the fiscal clift debate, we are joined by michael tanner and josh bivens. mr. michael tanner, if you had your way in these discussions, where what unemployment insurance end up at the end of the day? guest: i think the emergency extension should fade away and we should go back to the 46 weeks that we have been at, the 26 weeks of traditional employment, and extended benefits in states that have higher unemployment rates. you start with the fact that unemployment insurance itself, when you extended for a long times as questionable value. we know it leads to an increase in the on and -- unemployment rate. that is dubious enough, but when you factor in that we will deficit finance this and slow economic growth overall, destroying jobs of the same time we pay people for being unemployed, a thing that creates a problem. host: how much money do we save if we do not extend emergency
. [applause] >> on this morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the fiscal cliff and what happens a gold buckle -- if the budget cuts take place. jim doyle on the effect on businesses. then at charles clarke will look at domestic program cuts. more about the issue, with the brookings institution and the ethics and policy center. "washington journal" live this morning at 7:00 eastern on c- span. now a discussion on a state of voter id laws and 2012 pope. we will hear from ohio secretary of state sessions thiswo session and we have to end at 5:00 so want to get started. we brought together a series of experts and leaders in the field to talk about the issue of integrity verses access in elections where a voter i.d. fits into this. don't think we could do better than the panel we have right now. i will let our moderator introduce our panel, many of whom you'll recognize. >> you guys are in for a trade. you could ask for a better panel to think through these issues of how to balance integrity and access. i will say a word about each of the panelists. we will hear brief present
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)